Journal

At Home: Atelier Plateau – Anne Ejlsmark Berthelsen and Mikkel Schebye Johnsen

date: 31 / 05 / 20

In our latest At Home feature, we speak with architects and designers Anne Berthelsen and Mikkel Johnsen from Atelier Plateau, a design studio focused on creating patterned motif artworks from natural materials. Read on to hear how the Danish couple balance their work and home life under one roof.

ST.LEO: How has your perspective of home changed lately? To you, what is the most important thing about home
ATELIER PLATEAU: Our home is the space for both our professional and private life. The boundaries between our family and creative everyday are merging, which allows us to experiment with our home—a project that will be in constant change. To both work and dwell at home is not new to us, however lately this symbiosis has become even clearer as the majority of our everyday is spent home. The atmosphere in our home is essential to our everyday wellbeing and is defined by the light, the canal outside and all the details.

SL: How have you been creating and maintaining an inspiring atmosphere for yourself at home?
AP: Our creative methodology is always anchored in a visual and physical atlas of atmospheres, colours, materials and moments to create a point of departure for a project. Lately this has become increasingly essential to our work, as we believe it is important to be surrounded by physical objects that appeal to all our senses in a time where our external communication is mainly virtual. In our home we have therefore made more space for inspiration and brought materials and samples from our workshop to strengthen that process.

SL: Now can be a time to notice things we might otherwise miss. Could you please share some scenes or details from your home that inspire you?
AP: We are continuously exploring and challenging our perception of our surroundings. These observations are anchored in how we experience surfaces, light and the elements around us. We are fascinated with how a subtle change in a surface can transform the atmosphere in a space. When we originally moved into our Copenhagen Canal House it was a ‘white box’. Since then we have worked with every surface to get a raw, yet cozy atmosphere. Some days we are intrigued by the unfinished corners here and there, while other days we are eager to complete the many unfinished experiments in our home. We live close to an open sky and expanse of water, and we find calmness and inspiration in our connection to nature. For instance, we grow vegetables at our roof terrace and during the day we open up the glass facade towards the canal to bring the exterior into our home. Since our home has large glass windows, we have installed curtains to work with the natural light. The curtains are made in different colours and nuances, which allows us to move them around, adjust to the light conditions and explore new atmospheres in our home.

In our latest At Home feature, we speak with architects and designers Anne Berthelsen and Mikkel Johnsen from Atelier Plateau, a design studio focused on creating patterned motif artworks from natural materials. Read on to hear how the Danish couple balance their work and home life under one roof.

ST.LEO: How has your perspective of home changed lately? To you, what is the most important thing about home
ATELIER PLATEAU: Our home is the space for both our professional and private life. The boundaries between our family and creative everyday are merging, which allows us to experiment with our home—a project that will be in constant change. To both work and dwell at home is not new to us, however lately this symbiosis has become even clearer as the majority of our everyday is spent home. The atmosphere in our home is essential to our everyday wellbeing and is defined by the light, the canal outside and all the details.

SL: How have you been creating and maintaining an inspiring atmosphere for yourself at home?
AP: Our creative methodology is always anchored in a visual and physical atlas of atmospheres, colours, materials and moments to create a point of departure for a project. Lately this has become increasingly essential to our work, as we believe it is important to be surrounded by physical objects that appeal to all our senses in a time where our external communication is mainly virtual. In our home we have therefore made more space for inspiration and brought materials and samples from our workshop to strengthen that process.

SL: Now can be a time to notice things we might otherwise miss. Could you please share some scenes or details from your home that inspire you?
AP: We are continuously exploring and challenging our perception of our surroundings. These observations are anchored in how we experience surfaces, light and the elements around us. We are fascinated with how a subtle change in a surface can transform the atmosphere in a space. When we originally moved into our Copenhagen Canal House it was a ‘white box’. Since then we have worked with every surface to get a raw, yet cozy atmosphere. Some days we are intrigued by the unfinished corners here and there, while other days we are eager to complete the many unfinished experiments in our home. We live close to an open sky and expanse of water, and we find calmness and inspiration in our connection to nature. For instance, we grow vegetables at our roof terrace and during the day we open up the glass facade towards the canal to bring the exterior into our home. Since our home has large glass windows, we have installed curtains to work with the natural light. The curtains are made in different colours and nuances, which allows us to move them around, adjust to the light conditions and explore new atmospheres in our home.

Read More: atelierplateau.com
Introducing Ancoats: A New Colour Made in Collaboration with Youth Studio

date: 12 / 05 / 20

During an architecture workshop in Copenhagen, St. Leo asked UK practice YOUTH to mix their ideal shade of St. Leo Dolomite Plaster. This elegant green is the result of their creativity, and is now available to order in our collection.

Collaboration is at the core of St. Leo’s practice, and our Dolomite Plaster presents almost endless colour and texture possibilities—all it takes is a little colour pigment, our raw plaster mix, and an inspired idea to create a unique product. With collaboration and experimentation in mind, last fall we welcomed YOUTH STUDIO and 35 other international architects to a St. Leo workshop held at The Audo in Copenhagen. We invited the professionals to team up, gather their tools and plaster, and create their own shade of Dolomite Plaster. The result was an array of enticing colours spanning the spectrum, from rust to cobalt to pink.

Following the workshop, the St. Leo product development team chose to put one, truly special colour into production. Created by YOUTH STUDIO and named after the location of their UK office, Ancoats brings a rich forest green to the Dolomite Plaster collection. The colour is inspired by the industrial, dark green paint that adorns urban architecture in the Manchester neighborhood of Ancoats. This industrial green has a deep and rich character, whilst also being simple and honest. Ancoats by YOUTH STUDIO is available to order now for interior spaces in need of a timeless yet bold lift. Visit the link below to see Ancoats and the full Dolomite Plaster collection.

During an architecture workshop in Copenhagen, St. Leo asked UK practice YOUTH to mix their ideal shade of St. Leo Dolomite Plaster. This elegant green is the result of their creativity, and is now available to order in our collection.

Collaboration is at the core of St. Leo’s practice, and our Dolomite Plaster presents almost endless colour and texture possibilities—all it takes is a little colour pigment, our raw plaster mix, and an inspired idea to create a unique product. With collaboration and experimentation in mind, last fall we welcomed YOUTH STUDIO and 35 other international architects to a St. Leo workshop held at The Audo in Copenhagen. We invited the professionals to team up, gather their tools and plaster, and create their own shade of Dolomite Plaster. The result was an array of enticing colours spanning the spectrum, from rust to cobalt to pink.

Following the workshop, the St. Leo product development team chose to put one, truly special colour into production. Created by YOUTH STUDIO and named after the location of their UK office, Ancoats brings a rich forest green to the Dolomite Plaster collection. The colour is inspired by the industrial, dark green paint that adorns urban architecture in the Manchester neighborhood of Ancoats. This industrial green has a deep and rich character, whilst also being simple and honest. Ancoats by YOUTH STUDIO is available to order now for interior spaces in need of a timeless yet bold lift. Visit the link below to see Ancoats and the full Dolomite Plaster collection.

At Home: Sofie Brünner

date: 07 / 05 / 20

In our At Home segment, we hear domestic insights from creatives working in the interiors field. This week, Sofie Brünner—designer, stylist and design director at RUM Magazine—shares how she has been rediscovering a sense of home in Copenhagen.

ST.LEO: How has your perspective about home changed lately? To you, what is the most important thing about home these days?
SOFIE BRUNNER:
I’ve recently discovered new angles in my home and have started spending time in parts of the house that I’ve never utilised before. The right light, view and surroundings are vital when creating an atmosphere for working, relaxing or socialising with family in your home.

SL: How have you been creating and maintaining an inspiring atmosphere for yourself at home lately?
SB:
I have been upping my game in buying art. Both via online galleries, auctions or directly from the artist. I try to get a mix of photo art, sculpture and wall pieces that add stories and texture to the space.
We recently moved to a house with a garden and taking the time to delve in and out of the house during the day and experience the metamorphosis happening in nature right now, seems to calm and keep my head straight these days.

SL: Now can be a time to notice things we might otherwise miss. Could you please share some scenes or details from your home that inspire you?
SB:
Having gone through some twenty shades of greige to find that perfect tone in which I have painted all walls, ceilings and panels, I am now excited to see how light changes the colour throughout the day. Especially the view through several rooms at a time and the way light and shadow creates hundreds of tones—this makes my heart pound!
The deep red wall cupboard was a spontaneous decision. These days I’m thinking life would be dull without these instinctive outbursts.
I’ve been getting all my material samples out for an unforeseen interior project. Taking the time to see how a certain textile or tile transform according to light conditions has become an unintended luxury.

In our At Home segment, we hear domestic insights from creatives working in the interiors field. This week, Sofie Brünner—designer, stylist and design director at RUM Magazine—shares how she has been rediscovering a sense of home in Copenhagen.

ST.LEO: How has your perspective about home changed lately? To you, what is the most important thing about home these days?
SOFIE BRUNNER:
I’ve recently discovered new angles in my home and have started spending time in parts of the house that I’ve never utilised before. The right light, view and surroundings are vital when creating an atmosphere for working, relaxing or socialising with family in your home.

SL: How have you been creating and maintaining an inspiring atmosphere for yourself at home lately?
SB:
I have been upping my game in buying art. Both via online galleries, auctions or directly from the artist. I try to get a mix of photo art, sculpture and wall pieces that add stories and texture to the space.
We recently moved to a house with a garden and taking the time to delve in and out of the house during the day and experience the metamorphosis happening in nature right now, seems to calm and keep my head straight these days.

SL: Now can be a time to notice things we might otherwise miss. Could you please share some scenes or details from your home that inspire you?
SB:
Having gone through some twenty shades of greige to find that perfect tone in which I have painted all walls, ceilings and panels, I am now excited to see how light changes the colour throughout the day. Especially the view through several rooms at a time and the way light and shadow creates hundreds of tones—this makes my heart pound!
The deep red wall cupboard was a spontaneous decision. These days I’m thinking life would be dull without these instinctive outbursts.
I’ve been getting all my material samples out for an unforeseen interior project. Taking the time to see how a certain textile or tile transform according to light conditions has become an unintended luxury.

Read More: sofiebrunner.com
At Home: Andrew Trotter, Openhouse Magazine

date: 04 / 05 / 20

In our newest At Home feature, a new series of domestic insights offered by creatives, we hear from Andrew Trotter — founder of Openhouse Magazine — as he shares his experiences of sustaining creativity at his Barcelona home.

ST.LEO: How has your perspective about home changed lately?
ANDREW TROTTER:
I have home and my office as one for the past year, so in the end nothing much has changed. Usually when the Openhouse team are here, I have my desk in my “home” space which is divided by curtains, but since there is only myself and Marcelo here, we have taken over the desks of Openhouse so we can separate a bit of the work day and the home life.

SL: To you, what is the most important thing about home these days?
AT
: There is more order to my home now. We play around with things that before didn’t concern me, or I didn’t find the time. Marcelo is meticulously clean and tidy, which I quite enjoy.

SL: How have you been creating and maintaining an inspiring atmosphere for yourself at home lately?
AT:
We are very lucky, that between the architecture studio and Openhouse magazine we have a lot of work which is keeping us busy, but we are taking it easy and relaxed, knowing there is not too much pressure or deadlines. We are working on a few projects right now, and I made a model of a house that I would like to build for myself in a few years’ time. Just a little dream. I’m also taking time to actually read the books that have been on my shelves for ages. Architecture books that I know the pictures well, but never read the text. This is a time to learn.

SL: Now can be a time to notice things we might otherwise miss. Please share some scenes or details from your home that inspire you.
AT:
Our home studio is an industrial building from the 70s/80s. It is quite raw, yet we have made the space very livable and cozy, and the light in the late afternoon is amazing with the huge windows. All the walls and ceilings are white, and we have started to notice more these days that a texture and colour to these walls would be perfect. It would soften the space, make it more inviting and photogenic. Light, colour and textures are what build the space. We are full of curtains, as we have such big windows, and curtains that divide my space from the office, yet in these days we have been thinking that more curtains are needed to make translucent separations between the Openhouse kitchen and the office too. The space is so big and open, that is beautiful in one way, but sometimes lack the intimacy that houses with smaller rooms give. Everything is on display, so it seems okay to the eye, but messy in the photos where walls that divide would act as a backdrop to scenes and make the visitor discover room by room – rather than being so obvious from the beginning. We are in love with our space, but we always know we can do more.

Photography by Salva Lopez.

In our newest At Home feature, a new series of domestic insights offered by creatives, we hear from Andrew Trotter — founder of Openhouse Magazine — as he shares his experiences of sustaining creativity at his Barcelona home.

ST.LEO: How has your perspective about home changed lately?
ANDREW TROTTER:
I have home and my office as one for the past year, so in the end nothing much has changed. Usually when the Openhouse team are here, I have my desk in my “home” space which is divided by curtains, but since there is only myself and Marcelo here, we have taken over the desks of Openhouse so we can separate a bit of the work day and the home life.

SL: To you, what is the most important thing about home these days?
AT
: There is more order to my home now. We play around with things that before didn’t concern me, or I didn’t find the time. Marcelo is meticulously clean and tidy, which I quite enjoy.

SL: How have you been creating and maintaining an inspiring atmosphere for yourself at home lately?
AT:
We are very lucky, that between the architecture studio and Openhouse magazine we have a lot of work which is keeping us busy, but we are taking it easy and relaxed, knowing there is not too much pressure or deadlines. We are working on a few projects right now, and I made a model of a house that I would like to build for myself in a few years’ time. Just a little dream. I’m also taking time to actually read the books that have been on my shelves for ages. Architecture books that I know the pictures well, but never read the text. This is a time to learn.

SL: Now can be a time to notice things we might otherwise miss. Please share some scenes or details from your home that inspire you.
AT:
Our home studio is an industrial building from the 70s/80s. It is quite raw, yet we have made the space very livable and cozy, and the light in the late afternoon is amazing with the huge windows. All the walls and ceilings are white, and we have started to notice more these days that a texture and colour to these walls would be perfect. It would soften the space, make it more inviting and photogenic. Light, colour and textures are what build the space. We are full of curtains, as we have such big windows, and curtains that divide my space from the office, yet in these days we have been thinking that more curtains are needed to make translucent separations between the Openhouse kitchen and the office too. The space is so big and open, that is beautiful in one way, but sometimes lack the intimacy that houses with smaller rooms give. Everything is on display, so it seems okay to the eye, but messy in the photos where walls that divide would act as a backdrop to scenes and make the visitor discover room by room – rather than being so obvious from the beginning. We are in love with our space, but we always know we can do more.

Photography by Salva Lopez.

At Home: Jonas Bjerre-Poulsen, Norm Architects

date: 21 / 04 / 20

Introducing At Home, a new series of domestic insights offered by creatives. In our first interview, Jonas Bjerre-Poulsen — founder of Norm Architects — shares how he has been thinking about home lately, and what perspectives have arisen from a renewed focus on domestic life.

ST.LEO: How has your perspective about home changed lately?
JONAS BJERRE-POULSEN: Working with residential architecture as well as hospitality, I have always tried to be very thoughtful about what makes a good home. In Denmark and beyond, we seek simple comforts and soft-spoken luxuries in our homes and daily lives; welcoming spaces and tranquil settings where we can feel at ease and find room to celebrate what is truly important in life. Unhurried moments with loved ones and sanctuaries for contemplation in a world of distraction and hyperstimulation. It’s a fact that modern society favours vision above our other senses. The speed in which we consume imagery and visual content has accelerated heavily. The information perceived by the eye is digested within moments, and we immediately proceed in our search for new input, new visuals. The issue here is that we end up shaping the world around us to please the eye. If it looks good, that’s all that matters. But architecture and design talk to the entire body and all its sensory realms. Design touches us, physically. Hence, good design must not only look good, but also feel good, sound good, even smell good.

SL: To you, what is the most important thing about home these days?
JBP: The fact that human and nature are inseparable makes it all the more vital to have nature be part of our indoor environments – living surfaces, soft and calming nuances that makes us feel at ease. How we act or behave is largely influenced by how we perceive our surroundings, the same way we’re likely to act somewhat differently wearing a suit and tie from when we wear soft sweaters and knitted socks. The built environment that surrounds us is extremely important to how we feel on the inside. Surface and content are part of the same whole.

SL: How have you been creating and maintaining an inspiring atmosphere for yourself at home lately?
JBP: This new situation has given me the gift of time. Time to reflect, time to be present and time to work creatively with personal projects I have been thinking about for a long time, but never found time for. For the past weeks I have photographed intensively for a private book project in my small garden studio, which is finished with St. Leo walls, and worked to upgrade my house. Amongst other things I have worked on sewing new bedspreads and pillows in Sacho fabrics for my living room and bedroom to give the spaces a golden, warm and welcoming spring colour. I have also painted the walls and my big old closet in my bedroom. I went from white to a very light and textured grey. But it makes all the difference in the world. The more you work with colour, the more sensitive you become to even the slightest change in nuances. I’m slowly becoming an expert in grey tones.

About Jonas Bjerre-Poulsen
Jonas is an architect and founding partner at Norm Architects with over a decade of experience as an architect, designer, art director and photographer. Jonas shares his passion for phenomenology — the philosophical study of human experience — and striking spaces, objects and images with clients that range from established design brands to international magazines and private homeowners.

Photography by Jonas Bjerre-Poulsen

Introducing At Home, a new series of domestic insights offered by creatives. In our first interview, Jonas Bjerre-Poulsen — founder of Norm Architects — shares how he has been thinking about home lately, and what perspectives have arisen from a renewed focus on domestic life.

ST.LEO: How has your perspective about home changed lately?
JONAS BJERRE-POULSEN: Working with residential architecture as well as hospitality, I have always tried to be very thoughtful about what makes a good home. In Denmark and beyond, we seek simple comforts and soft-spoken luxuries in our homes and daily lives; welcoming spaces and tranquil settings where we can feel at ease and find room to celebrate what is truly important in life. Unhurried moments with loved ones and sanctuaries for contemplation in a world of distraction and hyperstimulation. It’s a fact that modern society favours vision above our other senses. The speed in which we consume imagery and visual content has accelerated heavily. The information perceived by the eye is digested within moments, and we immediately proceed in our search for new input, new visuals. The issue here is that we end up shaping the world around us to please the eye. If it looks good, that’s all that matters. But architecture and design talk to the entire body and all its sensory realms. Design touches us, physically. Hence, good design must not only look good, but also feel good, sound good, even smell good.

SL: To you, what is the most important thing about home these days?
JBP: The fact that human and nature are inseparable makes it all the more vital to have nature be part of our indoor environments – living surfaces, soft and calming nuances that makes us feel at ease. How we act or behave is largely influenced by how we perceive our surroundings, the same way we’re likely to act somewhat differently wearing a suit and tie from when we wear soft sweaters and knitted socks. The built environment that surrounds us is extremely important to how we feel on the inside. Surface and content are part of the same whole.

SL: How have you been creating and maintaining an inspiring atmosphere for yourself at home lately?
JBP: This new situation has given me the gift of time. Time to reflect, time to be present and time to work creatively with personal projects I have been thinking about for a long time, but never found time for. For the past weeks I have photographed intensively for a private book project in my small garden studio, which is finished with St. Leo walls, and worked to upgrade my house. Amongst other things I have worked on sewing new bedspreads and pillows in Sacho fabrics for my living room and bedroom to give the spaces a golden, warm and welcoming spring colour. I have also painted the walls and my big old closet in my bedroom. I went from white to a very light and textured grey. But it makes all the difference in the world. The more you work with colour, the more sensitive you become to even the slightest change in nuances. I’m slowly becoming an expert in grey tones.

About Jonas Bjerre-Poulsen
Jonas is an architect and founding partner at Norm Architects with over a decade of experience as an architect, designer, art director and photographer. Jonas shares his passion for phenomenology — the philosophical study of human experience — and striking spaces, objects and images with clients that range from established design brands to international magazines and private homeowners.

Photography by Jonas Bjerre-Poulsen